Tahoe Community’s ‘Wall of Shame’ Could Reduce Human-Bear Interaction

INCLINE VILLAGE, Nev. (AP) — A group of residents is resorting to a new strategy to help reduce the number of bear-human conflicts in their north Lake Tahoe community.

Several Incline Village residents are photographing business Dumpsters that are not properly closed and secured as required by a local ordinance and posting them with the offenders’ names on a Facebook page called the “Lake Tahoe Wall of Shame.”

There are currently at least 16 such photos of bins with unsecured trash on the page, the North Lake Tahoe Bonanza reported.

Group leader Mark E. Smith said he thinks bear-human conflicts would drop dramatically at Tahoe if businesses were more conscientious about securing their trash.

“The evidence suggests that trash is the primary attractant that leads bears out of the wilderness and, in turn, leads to interactions between humans and bears,” he said. “Therefore, our biggest problem is the failure to enforce the trash ordinance.”

Residents had similar problems securing trash from bears prior to 2008, when a campaign to strictly enforce the Incline Village General Improvement District’s trash ordinance resulted in greater compliance, Smith said.

Smith is asking IVGID to do the same with local businesses, saying they’re the culprit in the latest round of bear problems. The wall of shame surfaced after the controversial killing of a nuisance bruin in July that was captured at an Incline Village shopping center.

While many owners are being “very proactive” by complying with the ordinance, uncooperative businesses are being exposed on the wall of shame, Smith said.

“In the vast majority of cases, we are asking people to close the Dumpster and latch it,” he said. “It’s pretty simple stuff.”

IVGID is committed to stepping up enforcement of the trash ordinance in the community, said Joe Pomroy, its director of public works.

“We are working with the businesses to educate them regarding the importance of shutting and latching Dumpsters,” Pomroy told the North Lake Tahoe Bonanza. “If that fails, then we will fine them.”

Fines are $100 for a first offense and $300 for repeat offenses.

(Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

  • Afraid of Enviro-Nazi Retaliation

    Maybe bear-human conflicts would drop dramatically at Tahoe if the bears were shipped far away to live away from a densely-populated urban area, or if the bears who insist on raiding dumpsters were SHOT AND KILLED like they should be for being a potential menace to human life.

    Why are the enviro-Nazis allowed to dictatorially impose their dangerous nutsack nature fetishes on everybody else, and why do enviro-Nazis think that they can force everybody else to pay the economic and human costs of theirinsane enviro-nutsack policies???


    • termite

      Wow ! the world of nuts never ceases to amaze me , What he talking about ?
      They are bears hungry ones at that , the lived there first before humans , just like the Native Americans all you can say is kill them or ship them elsewhere . We need more people like you at the Napa State Hospital, keep those people working there. Dang !

      • human

        Learn to type and write correctly, you pest.

  • Michelle

    I think this is a good idea for making people responsible for how their behavior affects the wildlife and the human life around them. When you choose to live in bear habitat (and yes this was bear habitat before it was human sprawl, bears are just good at adaptive behaviors), there are certain rules you need to abide by, and unfortunately some people aren’t good at common sense so the rest of us get the laws for their nonadaptive ignorance. This program is inexpensive except to those with refuse to do their part.

  • virginia

    Thank you for your common sense.

blog comments powered by Disqus
The Taz Show
LIVE: Monday through Friday from 6am – 6pm ET

Listen Live