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Sacramento Residents Oppose Proposed Housing Development Project On 48-Acre Lot

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Anjali Hemphill Anjali Hemphill
Anjali Hemphill joined CBS 13 in June 2012 and she's happy to make the...
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SACRAMENTO (CBS13) – A decades-old debate over a 48-acre grassy parcel of land in east Sacramento has reignited after developers proposed a 400-unit development.

The plot of land sits just off the Capital City Freeway, and is one of the rare large open spaces left in the city. Developers have tried to build on the land before, but were met huge opposition from residents in midtown and east Sacramento concerned it would lead to crowding.

“It is quiet; we like it that way,” said resident Joel Harrison.

People who live near the parcel are furious that developers have launched their latest push to develop the land.

“It’s minutes away from midtown, from downtown. It’s close to jobs, close to commercial, close to markets, close to shopping,” said Megan Norris with Riverview Capital Investments.

The development would also be close to a few other things that have residents scratching their heads.

“Who wants to live next to a freeway?” asked nearby resident George Raya.

The land is sandwiched between Business 80 and railroad tracks.

“You’ve got the former dump right across the street,” said Harrison. “It’s just an illogical place to put housing.”

People worry their new neighbors will clog the narrow residential streets.

“Every time they want to buy groceries, or get some milk, or get the kids to school, they are gonna have to get in their car. So that might as well be in a suburban development,” said Raya.

However, the developers disagree.

“We really think the traffic will be minimal,” Norris said.

Developers know this big project won’t come without a big fight, but they insist they’re not giving up.

“We could be building something that’s 20, 30 miles away. That could add a lot to people’s gas mileage, but we want to do something in the city that we feel is a good sustainable project,” said Norris.

The community and city are still working on the plans with developers. If approved, the building wouldn’t begin until 2014.

However, people who live near the site say they would rather have the land turned into a park.

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