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Proposed Legislation Would Allow Calif. To Extend Alcoholic Service To 4 A.M.

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SACRAMENTO (CBS13) – Newly proposed legislation would give local communities across California the option to expand alcoholic beverage service hours until 4 a.m. at restaurants and night clubs.

Some states can regulate the hours alcoholic beverages are served. SB 635, authored by Sen. Mark Leno (D-San Francisco), would allow California to extend those hours or create flexible closing times. California law currently limits the sale of alcohol between 6 a.m. and 2 a.m.

“Many cities in California have dynamic social activities that are vital to their economies, but they lack the flexibility to expand their businesses,” said Leno.

The proposed law would allow counties to submit a plan to the California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to extend service hours for restaurants and night clubs to 4 a.m. However, it would not apply to establishments such as liquor stores.

Leno says the bill would allow California cities to compete for tourist dollars with cities and states that currently have extended service hours, as well as create more job opportunities.

A quarter of the nation’s top 100 grossing social and nightlife venues are located in California, including 15 in Los Angeles, seven in San Diego, two in San Francisco, and one in Sacramento. The country’s top 10 late-night establishments are located in cities that have extended hours, including Las Vegas, Miami Beach and New York City.

SB 635, is supported by the California Restaurant Association, Golden Gate Restaurant Association, California Music and Culture Association, and San Francisco Council of District Merchants. It will be heard in Senate policy committees this spring.

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