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Sacramento County Shootings Put Administrative Leave In Spotlight

When it comes to pulling the trigger, officers say they don’t shoot to wound
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Ron Jones Ron Jones
Ron Jones began his television career in 1988 while working as an...
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SACRAMENTO COUNTY (CBS13) — In the wake of two officer-involved shootings just 10 hours apart over the weekend, Ron Jones is getting answers as to what happens when officers are placed on administrative leave.

The first shooting happened early Sunday morning when deputies shot and killed 41-year-old Ryan Shannon after he allegedly pointed a handgun at officers while walking down an Antelope Street.

About 10 hours later, Citrus Heights Police opened fire on Gabriella Nevarez after she led police on a chase and rammed two police cars. Friends say she stole her grandmother’s car after an argument.

In both incidents, the officers and deputies involved were place on administrative leave.

“This is a period when they can take themselves away from the shooting,” said Sacramento County Sheriff’s Sgt. Lisa Bowman.

Sacramento County deputies are not allowed to return to work for five days.

“The five-day period is meant for them to have a decompression time to be away from work and be away from that atmosphere,” she said.

They’re investigated by homicide detectives, but if needed, they also get mental health counseling.

Each agency’s policy varies. Sacramento and Stockton police require three days.

And when it comes to pulling the trigger, officers say they don’t shoot to wound, but to stop the threat, which can lead to death.

“Basically that’s in the zone in the upper torso area and in the line of the head area,” Bowman said.

Even though the administrative leave is three to five days, usually the investigation is two to three months.

Citrus Heights Police say they’ve been involved in three officer-involved shootings in the last two years, including this weekend’s.

The department has no standard time off after a shooting, instead choosing based on the circumstances surrounding the investigation and the officer’s mental health.

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