Japanese Robots

221
221
1210
1210
1710
1710
Japan’s Tokyo University professor Yasuo Kuniyoshi unveils a 9-month-old baby robot “Noby” at his laboratory at the Tokyo University on June 11, 2010. The baby robot has two cameras and two microphones on its head and also equipped with some 600 touch-sensors under its skin. (credit: Jiji Press/AFP/Getty Images)
9-Month-Old Babybot Japan’s Tokyo University professor Yasuo Kuniyoshi unveils a 9-month-old baby robot “Noby” at his laboratory at the Tokyo University on June 11, 2010. The baby robot has two cameras and two microphones on its head and also equipped with some 600 touch-sensors under its skin. (credit: Jiji Press/AFP/Getty Images)
Japan’s Tokyo University professor Yasuo Kuniyoshi unveils a 9-month-old baby robot “Noby” at his laboratory at the Tokyo University on June 11, 2010. The baby robot has two cameras and two microphones on its head and also equipped with some 600 touch-sensors under its skin. (credit: Jiji Press/AFP/Getty Images)
9-Month-Old Babybot Japan’s Tokyo University professor Yasuo Kuniyoshi unveils a 9-month-old baby robot “Noby” at his laboratory at the Tokyo University on June 11, 2010. The baby robot has two cameras and two microphones on its head and also equipped with some 600 touch-sensors under its skin. (credit: Jiji Press/AFP/Getty Images)
Japan’s Tokyo University professor Yasuo Kuniyoshi unveils a nine-month-old baby robot “Noby” at his laboratory at the Tokyo University on June 11, 2010. The baby robot has two cameras and two microphones on its head and also equipped with some 600 touch-sensors under its skin. (credit: Jiji Press/AFP/Getty Images)
9-Month-Old Babybot Japan’s Tokyo University professor Yasuo Kuniyoshi unveils a nine-month-old baby robot “Noby” at his laboratory at the Tokyo University on June 11, 2010. The baby robot has two cameras and two microphones on its head and also equipped with some 600 touch-sensors under its skin. (credit: Jiji Press/AFP/Getty Images)
A humanoid robot, “Manoi AT01,” produced by Japan’s toy robot maker Kyosho, performs a hip-hop dance at the International Robot Exhibition in Tokyo on Nov. 26, 2009. Some 200 robot makers and institutes exhibit their latest robot technology during a four-day exhibition. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
Breakdancebot A humanoid robot, “Manoi AT01,” produced by Japan’s toy robot maker Kyosho, performs a hip-hop dance at the International Robot Exhibition in Tokyo on Nov. 26, 2009. Some 200 robot makers and institutes exhibit their latest robot technology during a four-day exhibition. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
A humanoid robot, “Manoi AT01,” produced by Japan’s toy robot maker Kyosho, performs a hip-hop dance at the International Robot Exhibition in Tokyo on Nov. 26, 2009. Some 200 robot makers and institutes exhibit their latest robot technology during a four-day exhibition. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
Breakdancebot A humanoid robot, “Manoi AT01,” produced by Japan’s toy robot maker Kyosho, performs a hip-hop dance at the International Robot Exhibition in Tokyo on Nov. 26, 2009. Some 200 robot makers and institutes exhibit their latest robot technology during a four-day exhibition. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
A dentist from the Showa University Dentistry School demonstrates a treatment on a dental patient robot named Hanako Showa, at the University’s dental clinic in Tokyo on March 25, 2010. Japan’s robot maker Tmsuk and the Showa University unveiled the dental patient robot to be used for student training, which imitates human reactions such as coughing, tongue movement and pain reaction. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
Dentalbot A dentist from the Showa University Dentistry School demonstrates a treatment on a dental patient robot named Hanako Showa, at the University’s dental clinic in Tokyo on March 25, 2010. Japan’s robot maker Tmsuk and the Showa University unveiled the dental patient robot to be used for student training, which imitates human reactions such as coughing, tongue movement and pain reaction. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
A dentist from the Showa University Dentistry School demonstrates a treatment on a dental patient robot named Hanako Showa, at the University’s dental clinic in Tokyo on March 25, 2010. Japan’s robot maker Tmsuk and the Showa University unveiled the dental patient robot to be used for student training, which imitates human reactions such as coughing, tongue movement and pain reaction. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
Dentalbot A dentist from the Showa University Dentistry School demonstrates a treatment on a dental patient robot named Hanako Showa, at the University’s dental clinic in Tokyo on March 25, 2010. Japan’s robot maker Tmsuk and the Showa University unveiled the dental patient robot to be used for student training, which imitates human reactions such as coughing, tongue movement and pain reaction. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
A dentist from the Showa University Dentistry School demonstrates a treatment on a dental patient robot named Hanako Showa, at the University’s dental clinic in Tokyo on March 25, 2010. Japan’s robot maker Tmsuk and the Showa University unveiled the dental patient robot to be used for student training, which imitates human reactions such as coughing, tongue movement and pain reaction. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
Dentalbot A dentist from the Showa University Dentistry School demonstrates a treatment on a dental patient robot named Hanako Showa, at the University’s dental clinic in Tokyo on March 25, 2010. Japan’s robot maker Tmsuk and the Showa University unveiled the dental patient robot to be used for student training, which imitates human reactions such as coughing, tongue movement and pain reaction. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
Ketch, left, and Hiro-pon, members of the Japanese pantomime group Gamarjobat, take part in a promotional ninth birthday party for Japanese auto giant Honda Motor’s humanoid robot Asimo at the company’s headquarters in Tokyo on October 31, 2009. Asimo, which officially stands for “Advanced Step in Innovative MObility,” was the culmination of two decades of humanoid robotics research by Honda engineers, who first began research on the project in the 1980s and then unveiled “him” in 2000. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
Hondabot Ketch, left, and Hiro-pon, members of the Japanese pantomime group Gamarjobat, take part in a promotional ninth birthday party for Japanese auto giant Honda Motor’s humanoid robot Asimo at the company’s headquarters in Tokyo on October 31, 2009. Asimo, which officially stands for “Advanced Step in Innovative MObility,” was the culmination of two decades of humanoid robotics research by Honda engineers, who first began research on the project in the 1980s and then unveiled “him” in 2000. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
Ketch, left, and Hiro-pon, members of the Japanese pantomime group Gamarjobat, take part in a promotional ninth birthday party for Japanese auto giant Honda Motor’s humanoid robot Asimo at the company’s headquarters in Tokyo on October 31, 2009. Asimo, which officially stands for “Advanced Step in Innovative MObility,” was the culmination of two decades of humanoid robotics research by Honda engineers, who first began research on the project in the 1980s and then unveiled “him” in 2000. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
Hondabot Ketch, left, and Hiro-pon, members of the Japanese pantomime group Gamarjobat, take part in a promotional ninth birthday party for Japanese auto giant Honda Motor’s humanoid robot Asimo at the company’s headquarters in Tokyo on October 31, 2009. Asimo, which officially stands for “Advanced Step in Innovative MObility,” was the culmination of two decades of humanoid robotics research by Honda engineers, who first began research on the project in the 1980s and then unveiled “him” in 2000. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
This combo picture shows a humanoid robot HRP-4C, developed by Japan’s Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) showing her skills during the Digital Contents Expo in Tokyo on October 22, 2009. A monster-slaying bad breath blow gun, a rain-simulating “funbrella” and a navigation-aid helmet that steers users by pulling their ears: welcome to Japan’s latest whacky inventions. These bizarre gadgets and more — some of them useful, most of them fun — went on display at the Digital Content Expo, a fair showcasing futuristic gaming, arts, medical and other technologies that opened on October 22. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
Humanoid This combo picture shows a humanoid robot HRP-4C, developed by Japan’s Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) showing her skills during the Digital Contents Expo in Tokyo on October 22, 2009. A monster-slaying bad breath blow gun, a rain-simulating “funbrella” and a navigation-aid helmet that steers users by pulling their ears: welcome to Japan’s latest whacky inventions. These bizarre gadgets and more — some of them useful, most of them fun — went on display at the Digital Content Expo, a fair showcasing futuristic gaming, arts, medical and other technologies that opened on October 22. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
A housemaid shaped guide robot, developed by Saitama University’s professor Yoshinori Kobayashi, delivers giveaway chocolates to the guests during a demonstration at the Robotech exhibition in Tokyo on July 29, 2010. Robotic wheelchairs, mechanical arms and humanoid waiters are among the cutting-edge inventions on show at a robotics fair in Japan, a country whose population is aging rapidly. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
Maidbot A housemaid shaped guide robot, developed by Saitama University’s professor Yoshinori Kobayashi, delivers giveaway chocolates to the guests during a demonstration at the Robotech exhibition in Tokyo on July 29, 2010. Robotic wheelchairs, mechanical arms and humanoid waiters are among the cutting-edge inventions on show at a robotics fair in Japan, a country whose population is aging rapidly. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
A model poses with a humanoid robot called Geminoid-F, shaped to resemble the model at a press conference in Osaka, on April 3, 2010. Geminoid-F, designed and built by Osaka University professor Hiroshi Ishiguro and Japan’s robot maker Kokoro, is equipped with 12 actuators, powered by air pressure, and her motion can be synched to imitate that of a real human being. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
Modelbot A model poses with a humanoid robot called Geminoid-F, shaped to resemble the model at a press conference in Osaka, on April 3, 2010. Geminoid-F, designed and built by Osaka University professor Hiroshi Ishiguro and Japan’s robot maker Kokoro, is equipped with 12 actuators, powered by air pressure, and her motion can be synched to imitate that of a real human being. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
A model poses with a humanoid robot called Geminoid-F, shaped to resemble the model at a press conference in Osaka, on April 3, 2010. Geminoid-F, designed and built by Osaka University professor Hiroshi Ishiguro and Japan’s robot maker Kokoro, is equipped with 12 actuators, powered by air pressure, and her motion can be synched to imitate that of a real human being. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
Modelbot A model poses with a humanoid robot called Geminoid-F, shaped to resemble the model at a press conference in Osaka, on April 3, 2010. Geminoid-F, designed and built by Osaka University professor Hiroshi Ishiguro and Japan’s robot maker Kokoro, is equipped with 12 actuators, powered by air pressure, and her motion can be synched to imitate that of a real human being. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
An engineering student soothes a baby robot during a presentations at a laboratory in Tsukuba University, Ibaraki Prefecture on Feb. 12, 2010. It giggles and wiggles its feet when you shake its rattle, but will get cranky and cry from too much tickling: Meet Yotaro, a Japanese robot programmed to be as fickle as a real baby. (credit: Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images)
Newbornbot An engineering student soothes a baby robot during a presentations at a laboratory in Tsukuba University, Ibaraki Prefecture on Feb. 12, 2010. It giggles and wiggles its feet when you shake its rattle, but will get cranky and cry from too much tickling: Meet Yotaro, a Japanese robot programmed to be as fickle as a real baby. (credit: Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images)
Japanese electronics giant Hitachi displays its humanoid robot “Emiew2″ which can move over uneven ground and small gaps on its wheeled legs at the company’s high-tech exhibition in Tokyo on July 22, 2010. Hitachi will start a pilot test at a hospital to collect data for the providing guide or surveillance services in a safe symbiosis with human. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
Rollebot Japanese electronics giant Hitachi displays its humanoid robot “Emiew2″ which can move over uneven ground and small gaps on its wheeled legs at the company’s high-tech exhibition in Tokyo on July 22, 2010. Hitachi will start a pilot test at a hospital to collect data for the providing guide or surveillance services in a safe symbiosis with human. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
A receptionist robot, produced by Japan’s robot maker Kokoro smiles during a demonstration at the International Robot Exhibition in Tokyo on Nov. 25, 2009. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
Secretarybot A receptionist robot, produced by Japan’s robot maker Kokoro smiles during a demonstration at the International Robot Exhibition in Tokyo on Nov. 25, 2009. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
A receptionist robot, produced by Japan’s robot maker Kokoro smiles during a demonstration at the International Robot Exhibition in Tokyo on Nov. 25, 2009. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
Secretarybot A receptionist robot, produced by Japan’s robot maker Kokoro smiles during a demonstration at the International Robot Exhibition in Tokyo on Nov. 25, 2009. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
A humanoid robot “HRP-4C,” developed by Japanese institute AIST, sings songs accompanied by Yamaha’s autoplay piano for a demonstration of instrument giant Yamaha’s voice synthesis technology “Vocaloid” at the Ceatec exhibition, Asia’s largest electronics trade show Ceatec in Chiba on Oct. 6, 2009. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
Singbot A humanoid robot “HRP-4C,” developed by Japanese institute AIST, sings songs accompanied by Yamaha’s autoplay piano for a demonstration of instrument giant Yamaha’s voice synthesis technology “Vocaloid” at the Ceatec exhibition, Asia’s largest electronics trade show Ceatec in Chiba on Oct. 6, 2009. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
A humanoid robot “HRP-4C,” developed by Japanese institute AIST, sings songs accompanied by Yamaha’s autoplay piano for a demonstration of instrument giant Yamaha’s voice synthesis technology “Vocaloid” at the Ceatec exhibition, Asia’s largest electronics trade show Ceatec in Chiba on Oct. 6, 2009. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
Singbot A humanoid robot “HRP-4C,” developed by Japanese institute AIST, sings songs accompanied by Yamaha’s autoplay piano for a demonstration of instrument giant Yamaha’s voice synthesis technology “Vocaloid” at the Ceatec exhibition, Asia’s largest electronics trade show Ceatec in Chiba on Oct. 6, 2009. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
A humanoid robot for educational purpose is unveiled by Japan’s Nippon Institute of Technology associate professor Yuichi Nakazato at the college’s campus at Miyashiro town in Saitama prefecture on Dec. 19, 2009. The robot has been developed with Japanese robot venture ZMP for use as an assistant for teachers utilizing a mobile projector on its head. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
Teachbot A humanoid robot for educational purpose is unveiled by Japan’s Nippon Institute of Technology associate professor Yuichi Nakazato at the college’s campus at Miyashiro town in Saitama prefecture on Dec. 19, 2009. The robot has been developed with Japanese robot venture ZMP for use as an assistant for teachers utilizing a mobile projector on its head. (credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)
Categories: News Photo Galleries Tech

Latest Galleries

The Greater Sacramento Economic Council Inaugural Dinner and AwardsThe Greater Sacramento Economic Council held their Inaugural Dinner on December 7th at the Hyatt Regency in Sacramento. Guests watched a special performance by local Sacramento performance painter David Garibaldi. Besides the thrilling performance, people enjoyed speeches about leaders stepping up in the region to take ownership of the strategic vision of our market. Guests also got the opportunity to connect with Greater Sacramento’s economic and business leaders, this inaugural event will set a high standard for the years ahead.
Remembering Pearl Harbor, 75 Years LaterA photo gallery reflecting on the 75th anniversary of the Japanese attack of Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941
The Crocker Art Museum Ball FundraiserThe Crocker Art Museum’s Crocker Ball, a benefit supporting special programs at the museum was on December 3, 2016. The signature black-tie fundraiser makes it possible for the institution to offer valuable programming for members of the region’s underserved communities.
Saint John’s Shelter for Women and Children Groundbreaking on a new facilityOn November 30th, Saint John’s Shelter for Women and Children celebrated the breaking ground ceremony on a facility to accommodate an additional 90 women and children.
90th Annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade
Raiders Defeat Texans In Mexico City
American Music AwardsGigi Hadid and Jay Pharoah hosted the awards show, which included performers by Bruno Mars and the Chainsmokers.
Sacramento National Philanthropy Day Awards LuncheonSacramento's twenty-seventh annual National Philanthropy Day was on November 16th, Hyatt Regency, to honor local individuals, corporations, and organizations in the greater Sacramento area who give their time, talent, and resources for the betterment of our community.

One Comment

  1. Cyndi says:

    you don’t talk much but apparently that is vocal. You say a lot on the blog, but its all good, your Dad doesn’t edit it and its all worth aidreng.St George sure gets kicked in the butt often. We got two feet of snow from that storm but its melting slowly and we have runaway rock filled ditches all over so the snow melt doesn’t do this to us. I saw the mess/lost houses the last time. It was right across the road from where Grams was living. Lost 9 holes of the golf course right below her place.Models were pretty naked tho. Showed a lot of skin. How about some young surfers next time. I could enjoy that. You know six pak abs etc. Keep up the good work and be careful on that Harley.Mom

  2. Romananamaria says:

    Ravens vs Titans -3: teams resting their sertrtas in Week 17 prior to a playoff bye are 1-4 ATS. The Ravens are the hottest team in the playoffs and are my odds on pick to win it all.EARLY PREDICTION: RAVENS with the points, score Ravens 21-Titans 10 .under 35. Cardinals vs Panthers -10:Anquan Boldin may be out and the public is pounding the Cards; the Cards are clearly the worst team left in the playoffs, the question is can they cover the spread without Boldin? The public thinks so, i’m not so sure the wiseguys do.. Carolina is a physical team and another east coast nemesis. PREDICTION: CAROLINA covering over 48, score: Cardinals 14-Panthers 41. Eagles vs Giants -4: Andy Reid is 1-5-1 in contests decided by a TD or less this year, Going into the Meadowlands against a well rested team, well coached and with Jacob steamrolling, i like the G-men in this situation, now if they could only neutralize the rampaging Dawkins, i’ll sleep better at nites.PREDICTION: Giants cover .OVER 41, score: Eagles 21-Giants 28 Chargers vs Steelers -6: leanin with the Steelers, the Bolts only lost by one in the regular season, and that was when they were struggling and the Steelers were hot. But then again, the Steelers got robbed of a TD at the end, so the regular season game should’ve been an 8 point difference. PREDICTION: CHARGERS with the points score: Steelers 14-Chargers 21 and Under

  3. Loris says:

    30 Years ago, Diana Ross had the hit “Upside Down” in 1980 and the NFL is that way right now!The League is no one’s right now but you do see some teams that are emerging with repcest like the Steelers and the Redskins. I like Alex’s pick of the Ravens over the Patriots because they have to show who they are against that Ray Lewis anchored defense. Getting Deion Branch back was a gesture to Brady to be content and not take all his fun away since Moss is gone. They have to show the world they aren’t mediocre and losing their touch in this type of game.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More From CBS Sacramento

Get Our App
Get The CBS Sacramento Weather AppGet the latest radar, CBS13 AppCasts and hour-by-hour forecasts. You can also send your weather pics.
Follow Us On Facebook

Listen Live