By Marissa Perlman

SACRAMENTO (CBS13) — Guilty on all counts. The NorCal Rapist, 60-year-old Roy Waller, faces life in prison for a 15-year string of crimes which included rape and kidnapping.

It took the jury about two and a half hours to hand down the conviction.

“That was the reason why. DNA doesn’t lie,” said Michael H., who was juror number 7.

Waller remained expressionless in court as each verdict for 46 charges was read out-loud Wednesday morning.

Michael said he had little doubt that Waller was guilty from the beginning.

“It’s just terrible the way he prowled on those young ladies,” he said.

Prosecutors say every assault had the same premise, women tied to a bed for hours with their eyes taped shut, the suspect stealing personal items or ATM cards on the way out. In court, Waller was painted as a stealth criminal who kept a list of women that he would grade on their appearance until he could slip into their homes and attack them.

His crimes, including rapes and kidnappings, spanned across Northern Californiaa cities from Chico to Sacramento. Prosecutors say he carried “rape kits” found in his storage locker, all filled with duct tape, zip ties and handcuffs.

“It was an open and closed case, everything was right there for us,” said Michael H.

Investigators used a genealogy website tracing DNA from crime scenes to Waller. It is the same technique that captured and convicted Golden State Killer, Joseph DeAngelo.

READ ALSO: DNA Unravels NorCal Rapist Mystery, UC Berkeley Employee Arrested

Waller denied raping any​ of his victims, despite police saying DNA was found at all but one of the crime scenes.

“He couldn’t tell us why his DNA was there,” said Michael H.

Nicole Earnest-Payte is Waller’s first known victim. For her, the verdict was a long time coming.

“Twenty-nine years of waiting and waiting. It’s amazing. A great day,” she said.

Theresa Lane was blindfolded and attacked in her Vallejo home in 1992. She fought Waller, stabbing him in the forehead. A similar scar on Waller’s head is something the prosecution used as evidence to connect her case in court.

“It was just good to stare at him because before I couldn’t,” said Lane.

The women say this is a step towards justice, yet maintain the pain of what they lived through will be with them forever.

“There are some things that will never go away, but he’s going away,” said Lane.

Waller’s attorneys had no comment and the prosecution had little to say except they’re grateful for the DNA evidence and hope for justice for the victims. Waller faces life in prison when he’s sentenced next month.

More from CBS Sacramento:

Marissa Perlman

Comments

Leave a Reply