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Smith & Wesson Won’t Sell New Models Over New State Gun Law

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Nick Janes Nick Janes
Nick Janes joined KOVR/KMAX in December 2008 as a reporter. Nick...
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SACRAMENTO (CBS13) — A major gun manufacturer has said it will not sell its new handgun models in California because of a controversial state law.

Smith & Wesson said on Thursday that the new microstamping requirements from the state are expensive and unreliable.

The process, required for all new or redesigned semiautomatic pistols, would stamp a code on a bullet unique to the gun every time it is fired.

Supporters of the law are saying this is a case of the gun lobby using scare tactics and overreacting.

If you ask Just Guns owner Josh Deaser, he’ll say California is already too tough on guns, and that the new requirement is just more of the same.

“It creates problems for me. It creates problems for the manufacturer,” he said. “Responsible firearm owners are not the problem, but they’re being constantly picked on because they just don’t like guns in California.”

In a news release, Smith & Wesson says, “A number of studies have indicated that microstamping is unreliable, serves no safety purpose, is cost prohibitive and, most importantly, is not proven to aid in preventing or solving crimes.”

In response to the gun manufacturer’s decision, the Law Center To Prevent Gun Violence said, “Smith & Wesson’s statement represents the same hysterical reaction that we have come to expect from the gun lobby every time a new safety standard is required by California law … It is not surprising that the gun lobby is trying to use scare tactics to stop the implementation of this law since they have done the same thing in the past.”

Smith & Wesson will continue selling its existing models in the state, but because they won’t comply with the law, their newer models won’t be available in California.

Ruger also announced it will stop sales in the state of California over the law.

A group has filed a lawsuit against the state over the law.

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