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Raiders WR Streater Bounces Back From Concussion

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SAN DIEGO, CA - DECEMBER 22:  Rod Streater #80 of the Oakland Raiders looks on prior to the start of the game against the San Diego Chargers at Qualcomm Stadium on December 22, 2013 in San Diego, California.  (Photo by Jeff Gross/Getty Images)

SAN DIEGO, CA – DECEMBER 22: Rod Streater #80 of the Oakland Raiders looks on prior to the start of the game against the San Diego Chargers at Qualcomm Stadium on December 22, 2013 in San Diego, California. (Photo by Jeff Gross/Getty Images)

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Oakland Raiders wide receiver Rod Streater made a quick recovery from the concussion he suffered early in training camp and is expected to be cleared for full contact for Thursday’s practice.

Streater didn’t participate in any team work Wednesday and was limited to light duty wearing shorts and shoulder pads while the rest of the team worked out in full gear. He ran crisp patterns during passing drills and made a handful of nice catches after missing one practice after getting hurt over the weekend.

Many players need a full week to recover after a concussion and have to pass a series of tests that are protocol around the NFL.

Streater, the third-year wideout who led the Raiders in receptions and yardage in 2013, bounced back quickly.

“I just had to go through the whole process with the concussion thing,” Streater said. “It wasn’t too serious. It was a minor one, a little headache.”

Keeping Streater healthy is critical for the Raiders, who have overhauled their passing offense with the offseason trade for quarterback Matt Schaub.

Yet even with the additions of James Jones and Greg Little – two former high draft picks – there is no clear-cut No. 1 wideout on Oakland’s roster.

Streater could be the answer two years after entering the league as an undrafted free agent.

Before getting hurt, Streater was taking the majority of reps with the Raiders’ first-team offense along with Jones. Both receivers have already formed a solid connection with Schaub, the former Houston Texans’ quarterback who is trying to come back after a miserable last season.

“I think we’re way ahead of where we were last year,” Streater said. “We took the time after OTAs and minicamp to stay around and throw a little bit … so I feel like the timing’s better than it’s been.”

Oakland was tied for 24th in passing in 2013, averaging 208.8 yards a game.

Part of the problem was instability behind center – the Raiders had three quarterbacks start at least one game in 2013. That’s why general manager Reggie McKenzie made the move to acquire Schaub from the Texans.

McKenzie had also talked about the need to upgrade the receiving corps, citing the need to add a playmaker like Detroit’s Calvin Johnson.

But Oakland passed on taking a receiver in the first round of the draft and instead selected linebacker Khalil Mack.

That left the door open for Streater, whose career has steadily risen with each season. He caught 39 passes as a rookie – the most by an undrafted player in the NFL since 2002. He followed that up with 60 receptions for 888 yards and four touchdowns last year.

“I feel like all the work we did this offseason really helped me,” Streater said. “I’ve been working hard, on and off the field, learning the game. Just the experience of playing two years in the NFL, I feel like I learned a lot. This year I feel like I can go out there, be confident and play fast and hard.”

Streater laughed when the subject of Oakland lacking of a No. 1 receiver came up.

“We all know how good we can be,” he said. “We have to just go out and play. It doesn’t matter who’s the number one and number two. When the ball comes your way you have to catch it.”

Notes: DT Antonio Smith (groin) and RG Austin Howard (back) did not finish practice. Third-round pick Gabe Jackson replaced Howard with the first-team offense. … TE Nick Kasa practiced for the first time after beginning camp on the physically unable to perform list.

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