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North Carolina Group Flies In To Rescue Abandoned Geese In Woodland

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WOODLAND (CBS13) – Abandoned years ago by a pet owner on a thriving pond, they have now fallen victim to the drought and predators.

About 30-plus geese were abandoned on a dried up pond. They were easy pickings for predators.


Jennifer Gordon, along with her team of water fowl rescue volunteers from North Carolina, rallied the troops in Woodland.

“It’s a big job and it’s all we do,” Gordon said.

They heard about the plight of these domesticated geese abandoned on this drought stricken pond and felt obligated to save them. They’re part of the non-profit Carolina Water Fowl Rescue.

The geese have no survival skills and are too fat to fly.

“It’s kind of where the term sitting duck came from,” Gordon said.

They’re an easy meal.

“We came around just to check around the perimeter and we saw a fox carrying one off,” Gordon said.

Mobilizing like a military operation, Gordon and her crew teamed up with local volunteers and Woodland city workers to corral the geese.

“You put your bottom feet on like this and you keep them in like that,” Gordon said.

It’s wasn’t easy to trap them. Before beginning the push, they checked every bush for hiding geese.

“Make sure there’s no nesting,” Gordon said.

The big push began and the geese were rounded up.

“Okay, everybody close in quick, quick ,quick, quick!”

“Get him! Just grab him, just grab him!”

“Grab crates, everybody grabs crates.”

Even a little wayward duck was captured.

“It doesn’t always go this smoothly,” Gordon said.

These Carolinians said their feathered friends were worth the trip to California.

“We put a lot of planning time into this so it would go well,” Gordon said.

And then from woodland it’s on to Bakersfield. A bird sanctuary there has agreed to care for the birds.

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